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10/07/2010 11:41 am  #1


Dragsters

I was wondering on the Pros @ cons on slip-joint chassis and convetional chassis . My observations ,it seems the slip-joint though slightly slower is more consistant,but harder to set up at first,but win a lot of bracket races when right! The normal chassis seem faster but sensitive to glueing. Just trying to get information for any one wanting to build their first one

 

10/07/2010 6:12 pm  #2


Re: Dragsters

The slip joint is best on clean tracks. It uses the "suspension" for traction so it requires little to no glue. They usually will not be as fast because they have to be geared accordingly with lower power motors to prevent it from just lifting the braid and arcing out. A conventional chassis uses wheelie bars so you can gear it to accelerate properly and use all the power you can throw at it. It also could be a little lighter since you do not have to pack weight on the nose like a slipjoint car. Depending on the motor the et difference could be anywhere between .040 and .100 difference.

 

10/08/2010 5:59 am  #3


Re: Dragsters

would putting whellie bars on the slip-joint design give the best of both? the front of the slip-joint acting as a swingarm to prevent braid arcing ,the wheelie bars to get launched. Slip-joints with out the wheelie bar do make nice scale looking front engined dragsters.

     Thread Starter
 

10/08/2010 6:35 am  #4


Re: Dragsters

I've run a conventional dragster, a driveshaft and now a slipjoint. 

The conventional dragster was reliable, but dependent on consistent glue, it was happy running in the .740-.750 range with a 20.  This car is set up for Comp Elim. and runs in the Econo Dragster class. 

The driveshaft car was also consistent and could be run with or without wheelie bars.  It looks awesome and true to scale.  My problem was that it was too hard to get the driveshaft balanced right. It's not a car for a beginner, you have to take the time to make sure that the motor and driveshaft are centered.  As with all of my JDS cars, it works great.  It's a little long w/ the wheelie bars, so it won't fit in my box, but that's okay.

My current car is a VProducts (Vito) slipjoint.  Took me 3 runs to get used to running no glue, but the car went to the semis in brackets on the first night, running 1.000-1.006.  This is the most consistent car that I currently own.  From June until now, the car has never varied more than .006.  When it does, it's my fault for doing something different.  It runs .950-.956 @ 63 mph all day long with a Big Block 20.  I could go quicker, but I really dig the way that the 1 5/16 rear tires look and I'm not changing them.  The thing with this car is that glue really slows it down.  It's great for no glue races.

So....  From all that I have seen, they are all good cars.  Personally, I would go with a slip joint car.  The less that you have to remember to do is better.  My routine with the slip joint car is: wipe the excess glue from the shutdown, wipe the first 5 feet of track, set it down and race.  How much easier can it get?   

 

10/08/2010 9:59 am  #5


Re: Dragsters

davidRevans wrote:

would putting whellie bars on the slip-joint design give the best of both? the front of the slip-joint acting as a swingarm to prevent braid arcing ,the wheelie bars to get launched. Slip-joints with out the wheelie bar do make nice scale looking front engined dragsters.

No. You would have to set the wheelie bars so high it would be useless. If you set them normal the chassis unloads at the hit.

 

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